16 DNA Markers Of Top Performers

BY: Joe Crisara

An Important Question

There is an important question that owners and sales manager’s in a successful contracting business ask themselves before engaging in training, coaching or accountability activities.

Here is that question…

“Do I have the right person?”

The difference between mediocre and champion caliber sales managers lies in their willingness to ask this question of every employee, themselves included at any time. The mediocre manager falls in love with the personality of the people they manage and assumes things will turn around eventually.

The winning manager never assumes that the person who they manage hasn’t changed to the point where they might not be a fit with the team any longer. In essence they are asking if the employee is capable of performing the skills and techniques that make up their sales system. Furthermore, if they do have those skills are they willing to take action by using them with a potential buyer? Continue reading “16 DNA Markers Of Top Performers”

The “Dispensable” Service Person

BY: Joe Crisara

“Where’s Jimmy?”

Ralph who is one of the senior techs working at an hvac, plumbing and electrical service business suddenly blurted out a question to his boss, “Hey Bill, where’s Jimmy? I haven’t seen him for a couple weeks now.”

Ralph was referring to one of the newer techs who joined the company about a year ago. “I think he’s on vacation, right Bill?” said Karen who is one of the CSR’s at the firm. Bill, who has owned the company for 29 years set the record straight, “No, we had to lay him off two months ago when it got real slow.”

Bill of course was just being nice. What he didn’t say was that Jimmy was a dispensable employee. He failed to add enough value to the team, his customers and the bottom line to even keep himself employed, much less to be considered a star player. Continue reading “The “Dispensable” Service Person”

Making Sure the Customer Is Actually Right

BY: Julie Crisara

Legend has it that, at the turn of the 20th century, the Chicago department store magnate Marshall Field instructed his salespeople that the customer is always right. Coincidentally, across the Atlantic, French hotelier César Ritz was telling his staff, “Le client n’a jamais tort”—“The customer is never wrong.”

So, for the last century, purveyors of products and services have grappled with the implications of these pronouncements that have become deeply ingrained in the consciousness of their customers. The problem is electrical contractors sometimes must decide when and how to tell the customer he or she is not necessarily exactly right.

“The customer is generally right about wanting to get an electrical project completed or a problem solved but probably not right about what information has to be exchanged and how the job should proceed,” said Joe Crisara, president of consulting firm ContractorSelling.com. “A given customer calls in an electrician perhaps once every five years or more, but an electrical contractor is handling 400 to 800 calls a year. So who is most likely to know the right way to make a sales call successful and get the project moving in the right direction?”

Continue reading “Making Sure the Customer Is Actually Right”

Service Mistake #29 – Wasting Your Customers Time

BY: Joe Crisara

We are using this as a caricature or “over-exaggeration” to point out some of the things that service techs do by accident. They may not even realize they are doing them until seeing how obvious it is in the film.

Things such as not having a solutions ready before you begin telling people the problems they have are subtle things that many may not notice even when they watch.

Other obvious things like allowing service techs to pick their own wardrobe or going out to the truck to figure things out can look like “amateur night” to the customer. You don’t think techs talk on the cell phone about personal business like “canasta night?” Go to a job with a few installers and you will be shocked at the personal business being conducted during normal working hours.

I do ride-a-longs and what I see is a fact of life and a day-to-day struggle to get techs to see how important it is to do good service. Maybe when they see what bad service looks like they will be sure not to commit these mistakes.

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